This musical work has been the subject of allegorical interpretations in both the Jewish and Christian traditions. However, newer interpretations by modern exegetes have also expanded to understand it as a description of married love. The author apparently did not intend to incorporate allegories or parallels, for instance to the book of Isaiah. Nevertheless, one can assign the Song of Solomon to the prophetic writings if it is seen as an allegorical work – otherwise, it could hardly be recognized within the Septuagint – or the Vulgate. The compositional “order” of these songs is rather best thought of as a “disorder.” Their constantly changing styles suggest that this work consists of pieces collected from various epochs following the return from exile around 400 years after Christ. Who is responsible for this collection is unknown. The inclusion of the Song of Solomon in the Bible, however, certainly makes clear that human love is sanctified within a revelation given to humanity of different paths. These are love songs. “The Song of Solomon” is also called “The Song of Songs,” so to speak. They were conceived in Palestine at wedding celebrations. The author delves into many details on the way to describing the union of man and woman. Beauty brings about the attraction of the two sexes, and is sung through and through in this song. This song helps to materialize the words of Genesis, blessed by God: “Be fruitful, and multiply.” Mutual adulation expresses itself as the inspiration of the lyrical word. However, in the Orient this of course leads to the enslavement of women to motherhood and sensuality, even to the present day (in fundamentalist thought). Although the “Song of Songs” is ultimately beholden to love poetry of the ancient Orient, it does bear the most striking resemblance to ancient Egyptian love songs such as “love songs from the straw.” What all of these love songs have in common, however, is the search of the bride and bridegroom for one another. This is likely an everlasting commonality among all living beings ...